Social Selling Training Course

Source: » Social Selling Training Course

DAPTABLE, BUSINESS SCHOOL STANDARD TRAINING, CUSTOMIZABLE FOR ANY INDUSTRY OR COMPANY STRUCTURE

Small, mid-sized or Large Corporate.
Add our industry validated online digital skills courses to your Skill set to target new markets, increase revenue and establish a competitive edge.

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ONLINE SKILLS TRAINING FOR SALES AND MARKETING PROFESSIONALS

Today’s buyer is digitally-driven, mobile, socially-connected, empowered with unlimited access to real-time information about business problems, products, companies, competitors — about all sorts of things. Also, buyers don’t have to rely on brands, interruption marketing or companies or salespeople for information, because they can find that freely on the web.
Prospects can compare your product or service and buy from the competition without you even knowing they exist.
The buyer’s journey has changed so business owners, sales leaders, managers, marketing and sales professionals need to understand how they can connect to and leverage these habits.
The DSI courses covering “Social Selling”, “Content Marketing”, “Social Media Marketing” and “Account Development Using Social Networks” have been developed in conjunction with sales coaches, digital marketing lecturers, business schools and over 5000 hours of research. They are designed for sales management, sales professionals, marketing executives and business owners to learn how to function in the digital media space. Full Course Information.

ONLINE SKILLS TRAINING FOR SALES AND MARKETING LEADERS

The digital connected world has turned the traditional sales funnel, on its head. Old sales and marketing tactics have diminishing returns. Change in sales methodologies has accelerated at dizzying proportions. We are in a constant state of disruption. Just when we think we’re getting to grips with the new, it’s already old.
The most significant change in our world is that digital connectivity has put power in the hands of the buyers. Instead of being passively influenced by marketing and sales, they actively search, research and compare.
In our courses, sales and marketing leaders will learn how Social Selling and Content Marketing can used as a vehicle for sales transformation. Plus learn how to evaluate, support and integrate digital skills together with social selling from a leadership perspective to become a social business. Also understand why digital selling is an essential requirement for sales and marketing teams, and how the relationships that are created and nurtured within social media will help you grow and sustain your business.

THE DSI SALES AND SOCIAL MEDIA TRAINING MANTRA

The use of social networks for sales is no longer optional for business. It’s a powerful strategy that can help sell ideas, establish credibility, attract and win customers. It is the result of the profound integration of social media into how we conduct our lives for business and pleasure. The buyer’s journey has changed in the digital world so sales and marketing professionals need to understand how they can connect to and leverage these habits.
The DSI programs are focused on providing excellence in design, transformational learning experiences and quality customer service. So we have built learning programs that brings thought leadership for sales and marketing professionals around sales tactics, lead generation, reducing cost per lead, prospect engagement, sales pipeline and revenue.
The tangible return on investment has been evidenced repeatedly in our work with companies both large and small to bring an untapped source of competitive edge for your business

ONLINE COACHING – ROBUST CONTENT 24/7

The always on access to course material and the cost effectiveness of electronic content can both be critical to managing an investment in digital skills training your team. At The DSI learning becomes real when applied with the help of seasoned sales and marketing coaches that will demonstrate and inspire social success. Each online session covers a different topic from our comprehensive course material.
Students can learn, ask questions and engage in dialog with peers. These virtual sessions will accelerate learning through reinforcement and are highly interactive. This ensures all training members are on-board and actively participating in their training and development.

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Improving construction safety

Source: Improving construction safety

Safety on construction sites is a constant challenge. Improving construction safety is of paramount importance for all construction companies. There is no denying, construction sites are hazardous places. Workers face daily challenges including preventing falls, and chemical and trip hazards. Construction health and safety is on everyone’s mind. What do you do to reduce the chance of accidents on work sites?

 

Set up safety steering committees

Often organisations use the top down approach to construction safety. Dictating compliance rather than involving workers so they have input into the process. Increase worker participation in safety activities that mean something to them. Give workers ownership of safety in the workplace.

Set up a safety steering committee made up of respected employees. Let them meet at regular intervals to review the safety audit, discuss issues and make recommendations. No management or supervisory personnel should attend. It is a place for open communication. For workers to express their concerns, leave management out. The purpose is to allow all workers to discuss construction safety and offer solutions from personal experience. This is the opposite of managing by directive.

Involving workers in construction safety, gives workers a sense of inclusiveness. After all, an organisation’s workers know how to better manage the risks in their workplace. Giving workers ownership of construction health and safety increases productivity. Highlight safety as a personal value the organisation stands behind.

Cutting safety budgets can be a disaster

Often the first thing to suffer budget cuts can be safety training programs. This can be a false saving over the long-term. New and inexperienced employees are more prone to accidents without the safety training they need. They also become a risk to themselves and to the rest of the work site. Accidents cost and if you lose a worker through an accident at work, then you will pay a high price. Invest in safety training to empower workers instead.

Keep safety training updated

Keeping safety training updated empowers workers. It keeps construction safety fresh in their minds. It also promotes better communication between workers and management. Safety hazards on construction sites can go unreported because of ineffective communication. More awareness results in less accidents. Less accidents means there is more time to focus on getting the job done. Good safety protocols boost productivity.

Updated training means old, outdated safety methods get replaced quickly. Implementing safety into every day operations reduces your risks and liabilities.

 

Innovative thinking

The accident rate would be higher on work sites without the innovative thinking of construction companies. They are devoting extra resources to keeping workers safe. Developing new practices and adopting technology can improve construction safety up to 100%. Keeping up with changing legislation can challenge improving safety protocols. Encourage an open exchange of ideas to find new ways to build on construction safety.

Software and technology

Technology improves managing construction projects. Software can link into your current processes and procedures, and existing safety programs. This allows everyone including workers to interact online using software tools.

Trying to track everything the old-fashioned way no longer works with pen and paper. It is time-consuming. Use software to track changes to construction safety priorities on an organisational level. Software platforms are a guaranteed approach to optimizing construction safety. You can configure software packages to meet individual organisational needs.

Advocate continuous improvement

Knowledge is a powerful tool. When workers know how to work with an organisation’s support, it creates stability. Stability leads to better ways to do the same work faster and safer. This gives the work site a culture of continuous improvement, which results in greater efficiency and productivity.

Document your safety procedures and plan using software to revitalize your business processes.

Proper equipment

Working on a construction site is dangerous enough without cutting corners with the use of incorrect equipment. All equipment should be suited to the job, and all machinery and equipment well-maintained. Most construction workers are subcontractors, what they do affects your reputation. And subcontractors, hire subcontractors to help them with the work. Make sure that you hire those with a good reputation and the right equipment to do the job. Check licences are in place for difficult jobs (for example, heavy crane work). Look at their own safety records from their work on past jobs. Check they are prepared to live up to your construction safety standards. And, make your stand on construction safety clear as part of the contract.

Conclusion

Regardless of whatever else you do, without the right management tools your organisation can be at further risk, you can even use some FREE RISK ASSESSMENT TEMPLATES. Technology has the ability to bring change and progress today. It has never been easier to integrate safety management software into you companies project safety alongside your processes and procedures. It is vital you keep up-to-date and accurate construction health and safety records.

Whatever your goals for improving construction safety, your organisation can have it all cost-effectively. Combine education, inclusiveness, innovation and commitment along with smart software to improve safety on your construction site.

 

Construction Risk Assessment

Source: Construction Risk Assessment

Construction projects can be dangerous places so understanding risk assessments and safety management is vital.  Everyone from the project manager to the site foreman need to be aware of any and all risks at every stage in the construction process. So, controlling risks takes good risk management to prevent or minimize the realization of any risks.

A construction risk assessment should be first addressed at the design stage to address any potential risks before the project ever begins. Next up, the project managers should complete a project risk assessment before any worker sets foot on the site and also have a method to monitor any risks at each stage of construction, a tool that can consider all the risks and possible risks. The tool or system should also be able to help the project manager mitigate any perceived risks and the financial cost associated with each risk. Also, it is important to be able to consider the cost to the whole project if they were to occur.

This brings us to the question; how do you stay on top of managing project risk assessments? The answer is you need good processes, procedures and construction management software. Here are some steps to help keep construction risks under control.

Know the source of potential risks

To manage construction risks, complete a construction risk assessment. Be thorough and consider the following areas:

  • Contractual risks. Missing milestone deadlines can cost time, money and a business its reputation.

  • Occupational risks. The nature of a construction site means there are many risks that can cause injury and possible death. Worker behaviour, technology, working methods, weather or a third party can cause accidents.

  • Project risks. The lack of good project management, workplace procedures, or workplace policies and procedures that are ignored and poor time management are just few project risks.

  • Natural risks. Natural risks (storms, earthquakes) are beyond your control but can shut a construction site down.

  • Financial risks. Financial risks include rising interest rates, a surge in material prices and a lack of sales.

  • Stakeholder risks. Use project management software to bridge communication problems, miscommunication over changes and deliverables.

  • Competition. Competitors can make life tough. They can drop prices to undercut prices and build times. This can put you under pressure to meet the same terms and put the project’s profit at risk.

Assess risks for their order of importance

Assess the risks into order of importance from most likely to occur to the least likely. Also, rate each risk for the level of damage it can do if it does occur and the potential cost to your business.

Dealing with identified risks

Construction sites are busy, dangerous places. Although the risks are varied, there are four basic management techniques to manage risks:

  • Avoid. You may choose to only take on a project in the summer of an area that has winter snow to avoid the risk of time delays.

  • Transfer. Ensure there are good contracts in place with suppliers and subcontractors so they take responsibility for missing deadline agreements with the company. Make sure the project has the appropriate insurances to cover any accidents.

  • Mitigate. Some risks you cannot completely remove. You can reduce the dangers of safety hazards, for example, but you cannot completely remove them.

  • Accept. Seasonal weather can be difficult to avoid. But, with planning and long-range forecasts you can work to reduce the impact on the project.

 

Use the right software

Once you decide how to deal with the risks arising from a project risk assessment, use technology to help optimize risk management methods. Good construction project management software helps manage all facets of a construction project. From costs to risk management, good software can make all facets of construction management more manageable and save time by:

  • simplifying the project risk assessment process

  • helping businesses comply with legislation

  • assessing and recording all tasks and risks on a risk assessment matrix

  • opening up transparent communication between managers, workers and stakeholders

  • adding everyone involved in the project along with their contact details into a central database

  • producing project-specific risk assessment and method statements

  • customizing the software to meet the needs of individual projects

  • providing a safe repository for project related documents that is available 24/7.

Get everyone involved in risk management

Construction risk assessment and management is everyone’s problem. Good project managers get everyone on the construction site involved in risk assessments and managing the risks.

Consult workers when completing project risk assessments. They are the ones at risk on construction sites. It is good to get their perspective and input on construction risks in their area. This gives workers ownership of the risks and more likely to comply with workplace procedures. Always communicate any changes and updates to keep everyone working with the same understanding.

What is a Construction Punch List

Source: What is a Construction Punch List

A construction punch list, is a list of things that do not conform to contract specifications near project completion. Also known as a snag list, it defines everything that needs addressing before final sign off and occupancy of the building.

As every contractor knows, construction projects can be difficult to manage. They can involve multiple stakeholders, risk assessments, O&M manuals plus lots of other project documentation. If any detail is missing it can delay the project completion with the knock on effect of costing the contractor  both time and money, not to mention the threat of legal action. This is why staying organized at every stage is critical to the success of any project.

 

When it comes to a punch list, it can be minor repairs to things like finishes and finishing off tiles; installing anything that is still outstanding such as an air conditioning system and cleaning the building ready for use. A punch list includes any final changes to the scope of the project made at the last minute and even warranties or other paperwork that needs chasing up.

The punch or snag list in an integral part of the construction contract. It is a control mechanism to meet the quality standards of the project plans and client’s expectations. There may be penalties if there is something the client is not happy about or the work does not meet satisfactory standards.

Creating an accurate punch list keeps everyone happy. It gives everyone a clear understanding of what work there is to do and timelines for completion. It is also an opportunity for the client to bring up any other concerns. The requirements for a punch list are set out during construction project planning.

It is the responsibility of everyone involved with the project to ensure the punch gets completed on time.

Client’s responsibility

A client has to take responsibility for making sure punch list gets completed. Clients need to make themselves available at this stage of the project. Be prepared to walk through the building making note of any issues or anything you want to question with the contractor. Do ask the contractor and tradespeople questions. It is too late once they sign off and handover the building.

This is a client’s last chance to ensure everyone understands their expectations at the end of the project.

Contractor’s responsibility

It is the general contractor’s responsibility to take the client through the building and discuss the items on the punch list. They will also listen to the client’s concerns and help work through them. The contractor can also use this meeting to show off their work and standard of the finishes on the building. A good contractor will have already picked up all the things that need doing and put them on the punch list. This is the time to let the client know what will happen to address the issues.

Subcontractor’s responsibility

It is up to the subcontractor to follow up and get the work on the punch list completed to a high standard. The point of the punch list is that it gives the expectation that all the work will be completed to a high standard and quickly.

Where things come up at the end of the project changing the scope of the project, the subcontractor needs to provide a quote and new timeline. It is important that subcontractors communicate and follow up and through on what they promise at all times.

Architect’s responsibility

Architects can attend a punch list walk through to check what was in their plans is what was actually built. It is their responsibility to highlight anything that is not within the project plans and specifications. However, some changes may be requested by the client and not added to the plans. The architect should accept this. Architects should take this opportunity to talk with the client. Find out how the final building meets their needs and expectations.

Final handover

The punch list is a critical step in the construction process. Task and Project Tracking means there are few surprises when you get to the end of the project. These are the last tasks to complete the building for final handover to the new owners.