Tag: construction management

Software that will improve Construction Safety

Source: Software that will improve Construction Safety

The construction industry is in a constantly changing. With new rules, regulations, risks and safety standards, it can be a tough task to keep up with the changes to comply with all the various regulations. Agile organizations that embrace change and use software for construction safety are finding they have a competitive edge.

If your business is still to lagging in using construction safety software, it is not too late to start. Improve construction safety with checklists and risk assessments. The reality is that software can help you manage quality and safety processes with more efficiency and accuracy, delivering a return on investment via lower costs and claims. Before you choose software, consider what features you need or your business.

 Integration with your current software

Everyone uses different software tools for project management. Look for software that integrates or replaces your current software. Construction safety should be an integral part of project management. Using software helps to provide transparency about how construction projects are progressing. It helps you identify and take action to avert potential problems before they occur. This saves money and time.

 Tracks workplace incidents

The construction industry has a high level of workplace injury. It can be a dangerous place to work. This means there is always an accident waiting to happen as workers go about their work on a job if everyone is not alert. It is vital you record health and safety incidents issues immediately. Record them within your construction safety software using a smartphone from the job. These records can be important for future risk planning or proof of legislative compliance.

 Provides team mobility

Good construction safety software will supply access to iPhone and Android apps for your team to use on the go. This allows team access to the system no matter where you are. Make sure the software you choose is versatile enough no matter what operating system you all use.

 Customization of Project software

No two organizations are alike or have the same needs. This means construction project software must  allow for customization to meet individual organizational needs. There is no point investing in software you cannot adapt to your specific needs. This includes reporting and processes as well as tracking and recording all construction projects.

 Easy access to forms

The construction industry has many forms to fill out. From budget and project updates to safety protocols and contracts, it is often vital to access them on the spot. Make sure the software has easy access to these from wherever you are.

 Access to mobile signatures

While on the topic of easy access, make sure your software gives you the ability to sign documents from wherever you are. This will speed up the efficiency of your business. It will also make the workplace safer as decisions are made on the go based on real-time data.

 Ability to record voice to text

It is important for construction safety software to have the ability to convert voice to text. This gives you the ability to record things like safety issues or incidents in real-time using a smartphone. This allows you to continue working hands free.

 Records staff training and certifications

If you have more than a few employees, it can be difficult keeping up with their training and certifications. This is a vital to your business. You must comply with local, state and federal health and safety legislation. Software that can store staff training and certification records will send out notifications so everyone meets their deadlines. It will also have the ability to view these as reports to see how each staff member is progressing along their learning path.

These are just some of the features to consider when buying software to help you keep construction safety at work. Talk to the specialists for expert advice on the best software to meet your needs.

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What is a Construction Punch List

Source: What is a Construction Punch List

A construction punch list, is a list of things that do not conform to contract specifications near project completion. Also known as a snag list, it defines everything that needs addressing before final sign off and occupancy of the building.

As every contractor knows, construction projects can be difficult to manage. They can involve multiple stakeholders, risk assessments, O&M manuals plus lots of other project documentation. If any detail is missing it can delay the project completion with the knock on effect of costing the contractor  both time and money, not to mention the threat of legal action. This is why staying organized at every stage is critical to the success of any project.

 

When it comes to a punch list, it can be minor repairs to things like finishes and finishing off tiles; installing anything that is still outstanding such as an air conditioning system and cleaning the building ready for use. A punch list includes any final changes to the scope of the project made at the last minute and even warranties or other paperwork that needs chasing up.

The punch or snag list in an integral part of the construction contract. It is a control mechanism to meet the quality standards of the project plans and client’s expectations. There may be penalties if there is something the client is not happy about or the work does not meet satisfactory standards.

Creating an accurate punch list keeps everyone happy. It gives everyone a clear understanding of what work there is to do and timelines for completion. It is also an opportunity for the client to bring up any other concerns. The requirements for a punch list are set out during construction project planning.

It is the responsibility of everyone involved with the project to ensure the punch gets completed on time.

Client’s responsibility

A client has to take responsibility for making sure punch list gets completed. Clients need to make themselves available at this stage of the project. Be prepared to walk through the building making note of any issues or anything you want to question with the contractor. Do ask the contractor and tradespeople questions. It is too late once they sign off and handover the building.

This is a client’s last chance to ensure everyone understands their expectations at the end of the project.

Contractor’s responsibility

It is the general contractor’s responsibility to take the client through the building and discuss the items on the punch list. They will also listen to the client’s concerns and help work through them. The contractor can also use this meeting to show off their work and standard of the finishes on the building. A good contractor will have already picked up all the things that need doing and put them on the punch list. This is the time to let the client know what will happen to address the issues.

Subcontractor’s responsibility

It is up to the subcontractor to follow up and get the work on the punch list completed to a high standard. The point of the punch list is that it gives the expectation that all the work will be completed to a high standard and quickly.

Where things come up at the end of the project changing the scope of the project, the subcontractor needs to provide a quote and new timeline. It is important that subcontractors communicate and follow up and through on what they promise at all times.

Architect’s responsibility

Architects can attend a punch list walk through to check what was in their plans is what was actually built. It is their responsibility to highlight anything that is not within the project plans and specifications. However, some changes may be requested by the client and not added to the plans. The architect should accept this. Architects should take this opportunity to talk with the client. Find out how the final building meets their needs and expectations.

Final handover

The punch list is a critical step in the construction process. Task and Project Tracking means there are few surprises when you get to the end of the project. These are the last tasks to complete the building for final handover to the new owners.

Tips for construction management safety

Source: Tips for construction management safety | Construction and AEC Project management software Raptorpm

Construction safety is serious business with legal and employee welfare implications. During the course of construction management, companies must ensure they take care of their workers. Organizations’ can face criminal charges if they do not comply with occupational health and safety legislation.

Accidents rates can increase on construction sites if safety is not on everyone’s mind. Also, laws are tightening to protect workers in the construction industry. Workers have the right to work in a safe environment, free from the fear of having an injury or worse. While it is a worker’s responsibility to take care of their own safety while on a work site, the employer handles construction management safety. Employers must conduct risk assessments, put risk management policies and procedures in place to guide their workers. Part of that is keeping up-to-date health and safety records, as well as organisational safety processes and procedures.

 

Construction Risk Management software can help organisations manage risk strategies in compliance with legislation. And, for the safety of all workers and anyone else on a construction site.

Even if you are following workplace occupational health and safety guidelines, there are things you should instil into construction workers. Learn how to practice the management of construction projects with appropriate safety requirements. Some is simple commonsense.

Chemical threats

Correct storage of chemicals is important. Some can react with each when stored close together. Workers must know how to deal with chemicals in accordance with manufacturer instructions and workplace procedures. Disastrous consequences can be the result if a chemical spill occurs. All workers handling dangerous chemicals must have the correct training to remain safe.

Walking the scaffolding tightrope

Walking the scaffolding tightrope while building hundreds of feet up in the sky is not for the faint hearted. It is a dangerous job. Common sense habits working at heights include:

  • erecting scaffold on solid ground stable enough to hold heavy weights

  • do not support scaffold on an uneven surface r try to level the ground out using things like planks or bricks

  • work at least 10 feet away from powerlines

  • do not use weak or damaged scaffold parts

  • do not put too much weight on the scaffold (overloading can cause accidents)

  • ensure there are sturdy guard and toe rails for worker protection

  • ensure the rig is checked by a qualified supervisor at the start of each shift and whenever it moves location

  • immediately replace damaged parts

  • do not use scaffold in storms or when there are high winds

  • keep an eye on your workmates and what is going on below.

Use the right tools for the job

Accidents and injuries can occur when workers try to use the wrong tools for the job. Consider the following when managing construction safety:

  • use ear protection in noisy environments

  • use eye protection when welding

  • do not carry tools by the cord

  • understand and follow workplace safety policies and procedures

  • make a conscious effort to be aware of your surroundings at all times

  • do not use damaged tools

  • use signs to keep non-essential workers out of highly-dangerous operating areas.

 

Operating heavy machinery safely

Heavy machinery is dangerous if not operated correctly. All people must be trained appropriately. Workers should keep the following in mind:

  • be careful when boarding or getting down from heavy machinery

  • wear appropriate gloves and footwear for the job

  • use a spotter to alert you to hazards in your blind spots

  • make there is enough room to move the machine safely

  • alert people close to the equipment of your intention to move

  • leave enough room to turn the equipment safely (heavy machinery needs more turning space than a light vehicle)

  • be extra careful when manoeuvring up and down inclines

  • do not allow unauthorised people use machinery

  • do not leave the keys in machinery when left unattended.

There is no room for complacency on a construction site. Using good construction management safety strategies for risk management will help keep everyone safe.