Category: General Interests

Social Selling Training Course

Source: » Social Selling Training Course

DAPTABLE, BUSINESS SCHOOL STANDARD TRAINING, CUSTOMIZABLE FOR ANY INDUSTRY OR COMPANY STRUCTURE

Small, mid-sized or Large Corporate.
Add our industry validated online digital skills courses to your Skill set to target new markets, increase revenue and establish a competitive edge.

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ONLINE SKILLS TRAINING FOR SALES AND MARKETING PROFESSIONALS

Today’s buyer is digitally-driven, mobile, socially-connected, empowered with unlimited access to real-time information about business problems, products, companies, competitors — about all sorts of things. Also, buyers don’t have to rely on brands, interruption marketing or companies or salespeople for information, because they can find that freely on the web.
Prospects can compare your product or service and buy from the competition without you even knowing they exist.
The buyer’s journey has changed so business owners, sales leaders, managers, marketing and sales professionals need to understand how they can connect to and leverage these habits.
The DSI courses covering “Social Selling”, “Content Marketing”, “Social Media Marketing” and “Account Development Using Social Networks” have been developed in conjunction with sales coaches, digital marketing lecturers, business schools and over 5000 hours of research. They are designed for sales management, sales professionals, marketing executives and business owners to learn how to function in the digital media space. Full Course Information.

ONLINE SKILLS TRAINING FOR SALES AND MARKETING LEADERS

The digital connected world has turned the traditional sales funnel, on its head. Old sales and marketing tactics have diminishing returns. Change in sales methodologies has accelerated at dizzying proportions. We are in a constant state of disruption. Just when we think we’re getting to grips with the new, it’s already old.
The most significant change in our world is that digital connectivity has put power in the hands of the buyers. Instead of being passively influenced by marketing and sales, they actively search, research and compare.
In our courses, sales and marketing leaders will learn how Social Selling and Content Marketing can used as a vehicle for sales transformation. Plus learn how to evaluate, support and integrate digital skills together with social selling from a leadership perspective to become a social business. Also understand why digital selling is an essential requirement for sales and marketing teams, and how the relationships that are created and nurtured within social media will help you grow and sustain your business.

THE DSI SALES AND SOCIAL MEDIA TRAINING MANTRA

The use of social networks for sales is no longer optional for business. It’s a powerful strategy that can help sell ideas, establish credibility, attract and win customers. It is the result of the profound integration of social media into how we conduct our lives for business and pleasure. The buyer’s journey has changed in the digital world so sales and marketing professionals need to understand how they can connect to and leverage these habits.
The DSI programs are focused on providing excellence in design, transformational learning experiences and quality customer service. So we have built learning programs that brings thought leadership for sales and marketing professionals around sales tactics, lead generation, reducing cost per lead, prospect engagement, sales pipeline and revenue.
The tangible return on investment has been evidenced repeatedly in our work with companies both large and small to bring an untapped source of competitive edge for your business

ONLINE COACHING – ROBUST CONTENT 24/7

The always on access to course material and the cost effectiveness of electronic content can both be critical to managing an investment in digital skills training your team. At The DSI learning becomes real when applied with the help of seasoned sales and marketing coaches that will demonstrate and inspire social success. Each online session covers a different topic from our comprehensive course material.
Students can learn, ask questions and engage in dialog with peers. These virtual sessions will accelerate learning through reinforcement and are highly interactive. This ensures all training members are on-board and actively participating in their training and development.

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Construction Risk Assessment

Source: Construction Risk Assessment

Construction projects can be dangerous places so understanding risk assessments and safety management is vital.  Everyone from the project manager to the site foreman need to be aware of any and all risks at every stage in the construction process. So, controlling risks takes good risk management to prevent or minimize the realization of any risks.

A construction risk assessment should be first addressed at the design stage to address any potential risks before the project ever begins. Next up, the project managers should complete a project risk assessment before any worker sets foot on the site and also have a method to monitor any risks at each stage of construction, a tool that can consider all the risks and possible risks. The tool or system should also be able to help the project manager mitigate any perceived risks and the financial cost associated with each risk. Also, it is important to be able to consider the cost to the whole project if they were to occur.

This brings us to the question; how do you stay on top of managing project risk assessments? The answer is you need good processes, procedures and construction management software. Here are some steps to help keep construction risks under control.

Know the source of potential risks

To manage construction risks, complete a construction risk assessment. Be thorough and consider the following areas:

  • Contractual risks. Missing milestone deadlines can cost time, money and a business its reputation.

  • Occupational risks. The nature of a construction site means there are many risks that can cause injury and possible death. Worker behaviour, technology, working methods, weather or a third party can cause accidents.

  • Project risks. The lack of good project management, workplace procedures, or workplace policies and procedures that are ignored and poor time management are just few project risks.

  • Natural risks. Natural risks (storms, earthquakes) are beyond your control but can shut a construction site down.

  • Financial risks. Financial risks include rising interest rates, a surge in material prices and a lack of sales.

  • Stakeholder risks. Use project management software to bridge communication problems, miscommunication over changes and deliverables.

  • Competition. Competitors can make life tough. They can drop prices to undercut prices and build times. This can put you under pressure to meet the same terms and put the project’s profit at risk.

Assess risks for their order of importance

Assess the risks into order of importance from most likely to occur to the least likely. Also, rate each risk for the level of damage it can do if it does occur and the potential cost to your business.

Dealing with identified risks

Construction sites are busy, dangerous places. Although the risks are varied, there are four basic management techniques to manage risks:

  • Avoid. You may choose to only take on a project in the summer of an area that has winter snow to avoid the risk of time delays.

  • Transfer. Ensure there are good contracts in place with suppliers and subcontractors so they take responsibility for missing deadline agreements with the company. Make sure the project has the appropriate insurances to cover any accidents.

  • Mitigate. Some risks you cannot completely remove. You can reduce the dangers of safety hazards, for example, but you cannot completely remove them.

  • Accept. Seasonal weather can be difficult to avoid. But, with planning and long-range forecasts you can work to reduce the impact on the project.

 

Use the right software

Once you decide how to deal with the risks arising from a project risk assessment, use technology to help optimize risk management methods. Good construction project management software helps manage all facets of a construction project. From costs to risk management, good software can make all facets of construction management more manageable and save time by:

  • simplifying the project risk assessment process

  • helping businesses comply with legislation

  • assessing and recording all tasks and risks on a risk assessment matrix

  • opening up transparent communication between managers, workers and stakeholders

  • adding everyone involved in the project along with their contact details into a central database

  • producing project-specific risk assessment and method statements

  • customizing the software to meet the needs of individual projects

  • providing a safe repository for project related documents that is available 24/7.

Get everyone involved in risk management

Construction risk assessment and management is everyone’s problem. Good project managers get everyone on the construction site involved in risk assessments and managing the risks.

Consult workers when completing project risk assessments. They are the ones at risk on construction sites. It is good to get their perspective and input on construction risks in their area. This gives workers ownership of the risks and more likely to comply with workplace procedures. Always communicate any changes and updates to keep everyone working with the same understanding.

What is a Construction Punch List

Source: What is a Construction Punch List

A construction punch list, is a list of things that do not conform to contract specifications near project completion. Also known as a snag list, it defines everything that needs addressing before final sign off and occupancy of the building.

As every contractor knows, construction projects can be difficult to manage. They can involve multiple stakeholders, risk assessments, O&M manuals plus lots of other project documentation. If any detail is missing it can delay the project completion with the knock on effect of costing the contractor  both time and money, not to mention the threat of legal action. This is why staying organized at every stage is critical to the success of any project.

 

When it comes to a punch list, it can be minor repairs to things like finishes and finishing off tiles; installing anything that is still outstanding such as an air conditioning system and cleaning the building ready for use. A punch list includes any final changes to the scope of the project made at the last minute and even warranties or other paperwork that needs chasing up.

The punch or snag list in an integral part of the construction contract. It is a control mechanism to meet the quality standards of the project plans and client’s expectations. There may be penalties if there is something the client is not happy about or the work does not meet satisfactory standards.

Creating an accurate punch list keeps everyone happy. It gives everyone a clear understanding of what work there is to do and timelines for completion. It is also an opportunity for the client to bring up any other concerns. The requirements for a punch list are set out during construction project planning.

It is the responsibility of everyone involved with the project to ensure the punch gets completed on time.

Client’s responsibility

A client has to take responsibility for making sure punch list gets completed. Clients need to make themselves available at this stage of the project. Be prepared to walk through the building making note of any issues or anything you want to question with the contractor. Do ask the contractor and tradespeople questions. It is too late once they sign off and handover the building.

This is a client’s last chance to ensure everyone understands their expectations at the end of the project.

Contractor’s responsibility

It is the general contractor’s responsibility to take the client through the building and discuss the items on the punch list. They will also listen to the client’s concerns and help work through them. The contractor can also use this meeting to show off their work and standard of the finishes on the building. A good contractor will have already picked up all the things that need doing and put them on the punch list. This is the time to let the client know what will happen to address the issues.

Subcontractor’s responsibility

It is up to the subcontractor to follow up and get the work on the punch list completed to a high standard. The point of the punch list is that it gives the expectation that all the work will be completed to a high standard and quickly.

Where things come up at the end of the project changing the scope of the project, the subcontractor needs to provide a quote and new timeline. It is important that subcontractors communicate and follow up and through on what they promise at all times.

Architect’s responsibility

Architects can attend a punch list walk through to check what was in their plans is what was actually built. It is their responsibility to highlight anything that is not within the project plans and specifications. However, some changes may be requested by the client and not added to the plans. The architect should accept this. Architects should take this opportunity to talk with the client. Find out how the final building meets their needs and expectations.

Final handover

The punch list is a critical step in the construction process. Task and Project Tracking means there are few surprises when you get to the end of the project. These are the last tasks to complete the building for final handover to the new owners.

Tips for construction management safety

Source: Tips for construction management safety | Construction and AEC Project management software Raptorpm

Construction safety is serious business with legal and employee welfare implications. During the course of construction management, companies must ensure they take care of their workers. Organizations’ can face criminal charges if they do not comply with occupational health and safety legislation.

Accidents rates can increase on construction sites if safety is not on everyone’s mind. Also, laws are tightening to protect workers in the construction industry. Workers have the right to work in a safe environment, free from the fear of having an injury or worse. While it is a worker’s responsibility to take care of their own safety while on a work site, the employer handles construction management safety. Employers must conduct risk assessments, put risk management policies and procedures in place to guide their workers. Part of that is keeping up-to-date health and safety records, as well as organisational safety processes and procedures.

 

Construction Risk Management software can help organisations manage risk strategies in compliance with legislation. And, for the safety of all workers and anyone else on a construction site.

Even if you are following workplace occupational health and safety guidelines, there are things you should instil into construction workers. Learn how to practice the management of construction projects with appropriate safety requirements. Some is simple commonsense.

Chemical threats

Correct storage of chemicals is important. Some can react with each when stored close together. Workers must know how to deal with chemicals in accordance with manufacturer instructions and workplace procedures. Disastrous consequences can be the result if a chemical spill occurs. All workers handling dangerous chemicals must have the correct training to remain safe.

Walking the scaffolding tightrope

Walking the scaffolding tightrope while building hundreds of feet up in the sky is not for the faint hearted. It is a dangerous job. Common sense habits working at heights include:

  • erecting scaffold on solid ground stable enough to hold heavy weights

  • do not support scaffold on an uneven surface r try to level the ground out using things like planks or bricks

  • work at least 10 feet away from powerlines

  • do not use weak or damaged scaffold parts

  • do not put too much weight on the scaffold (overloading can cause accidents)

  • ensure there are sturdy guard and toe rails for worker protection

  • ensure the rig is checked by a qualified supervisor at the start of each shift and whenever it moves location

  • immediately replace damaged parts

  • do not use scaffold in storms or when there are high winds

  • keep an eye on your workmates and what is going on below.

Use the right tools for the job

Accidents and injuries can occur when workers try to use the wrong tools for the job. Consider the following when managing construction safety:

  • use ear protection in noisy environments

  • use eye protection when welding

  • do not carry tools by the cord

  • understand and follow workplace safety policies and procedures

  • make a conscious effort to be aware of your surroundings at all times

  • do not use damaged tools

  • use signs to keep non-essential workers out of highly-dangerous operating areas.

 

Operating heavy machinery safely

Heavy machinery is dangerous if not operated correctly. All people must be trained appropriately. Workers should keep the following in mind:

  • be careful when boarding or getting down from heavy machinery

  • wear appropriate gloves and footwear for the job

  • use a spotter to alert you to hazards in your blind spots

  • make there is enough room to move the machine safely

  • alert people close to the equipment of your intention to move

  • leave enough room to turn the equipment safely (heavy machinery needs more turning space than a light vehicle)

  • be extra careful when manoeuvring up and down inclines

  • do not allow unauthorised people use machinery

  • do not leave the keys in machinery when left unattended.

There is no room for complacency on a construction site. Using good construction management safety strategies for risk management will help keep everyone safe.